Web accessibility is not a design constraint

Three practical tips to advocate for web accessibility

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This story is repurposed from my blog post published on labzero.com on 9/28/16.

Tip #1: Learn how screen readers work

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Marc Sutton, screen reader specialist, shows how blind people access the Internet and screen reader technologies with a keyboard, instead of a mouse.

Tip #2: Test your website for color contrast

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Using the WebAIM color contrast checker, here are three sample color combinations and the resulting PASS or FAIL assessment.
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Before: For those not suffering from any level of color vision deficiency, the cover photo for this blog post contains colors that fade from green in the top-left corner to red in the bottom-right.
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After: Color blindness simulators, such as Coblis, show how a “red-blind” person would view this blog post’s cover photo, which features inaccessible bright green and red colors.

Tip #3: Ditch your mouse and see whether you can navigate your website by keyboard

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An accessibility audit for this blog post

Accessibility is not a constraint

Additional resources

Product designer focused on UX/UI and user research (he/him) claytonhopkins.com

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